Katie Meyer: precedent indicates Stanford soccer player wrongful death lawsuit will fail; post-injection suicide, vaccine mandate arguments would have fared better

TheCOVIDBlog.com
November 28, 2022

Ms. Katie Meyer. PHOTO CREDIT: Stanford Athletic Department.

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA — This article is prefaced with a few points that must be made for context. This blogger is quite familiar and experienced with both topics at hand – the law and suicide. The previous is a cutthroat, dog-eat-dog business. Justice and the law are two completely separate, unrelated issues. Courts are the least likely places you’ll ever find justice.

Suicide is a personal choice. It’s also a taboo subject in mainstream circles because of tribal, political virtue signaling. Liberal politicians (tribal leaders) are pro-war (especially Ukraine), and believe in “pro-choice” when it’s a pregnant woman killing a baby. They are also fine with single mothers killing one-year-old kids. But when a living human being wants to take their own life, the virtue signaling is poured on thick – “people love you,” “help is available,” etc.

Conservative tribal leaders, meanwhile, are pro-death penalty and pro-war. They also don’t care, and even enjoy it to an extent, when Americans are killed by cops, unless it’s January 6 rioter Ashli Babbitt. Conservatives recite Bible verses for their anti-suicide virtue signaling. Both tribes also push the mRNA and viral vector DNA shots, which are de-facto suicide injections.

This blogger has written several horror articles in the past decade, chronicling people’s experiences with calling suicide hotlines. They talk to total strangers for, in some cases, hours. Once the caller hangs up the phone, cops bust down their doors with guns drawn, drag them to insane asylums, and drug them to the brink of death. That’s the “help” offered by suicide hotlines.

Every mainstream media article related to suicide has that fake concern “get help” message at the end. Further, if you search anything suicide related in Google, you get this:

This blogger has also walked the suicide plank a few times in life, and thus knows the drill. The point is that society must cease the phony, hypocritical concern for suicidal individuals. Keep all the foregoing in mind throughout this article.

Katie Meyer recap

We first wrote about Stanford University soccer star Katie Meyer on March 4. She passed away on March 1. There was only speculation at the time that the cause of death of suicide. It was confirmed a few weeks later.

Ms. Meyer quickly made a name for herself as a trash-talking freshman goalie who backed it up on the pitch. She led Stanford to a national championship in 2019.

She was well on her way to a successful career, whether she chose professional soccer or utilizing her prestigious Stanford education. Ms. Meyer would have graduated with a degree in international relations in May. She had applied to law school as well. Ms. Meyer was already making money via the NCAA name, image, likeness (NIL) policy. Suicide simply didn’t and doesn’t make sense for Ms. Meyer – that is until you understand Stanford’s vaccine mandate since the Fall 2021 semester, and booster mandate since January.

Several mainstream media outlets reported last week that Mr. and Mrs. Steven and Gina Meyer, Katie’s parents, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Stanford in Santa Clara County Superior Court on November 23. However, there is no record of a lawsuit filed in the last week with a Meyer as Plaintiff and/or Stanford as defendant. As of Sunday, November 27,  there was still no official lawsuit docketed with Santa Clara County.

RELATED: Nate Bronstein: 15-year-old Chicago high school student commits suicide after relentless bullying for false rumor of being non-vaccinated (April 29, 2022)

 

It’s unclear why mainstream media, in unison, reported that this lawsuit was officially filed when Santa Clara County court records are easily accessible online. Stanford Assistant Vice President of External Communications Dee Mostofi told said news outlet that she had not seen the complaint either. That said, The COVID Blog™ obtained a copy of a non-filed complaint from a source – a former colleague in mainstream media.

Four lawyers in three states prepared an eight-count, 72-page complaint on behalf of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer, versus Stanford University, several Stanford employees, and 50 John and Jane Does. The lawsuit alleges that Stanford is responsible for Ms. Meyer’s suicide. The complaint seeks injunctive relief, compensatory and punitive damages, and attorney fees.

We’ll get to the Meyer vs. Stanford complaint later. But precedent says the Meyers are fighting a losing battle.

The 1990 Judas Priest subliminal message suicide decision

Mr. Raymond Belknap, 18, and Mr. James Vance, 20, were drinking beer and smoking weed while listening to British heavy metal band Judas Priest in Reno, Nevada, on December 23, 1985. Both were high school dropouts, unemployed, and had criminal records.

They spontaneously made a suicide pact that night. The two young men walked to a church playground chanting “do it, do it,” according to court documents. They shot themselves in the head with a 12-gauge shotgun. Mr. Belknap died instantly, while Mr. Vance survived. But he was severely disfigured.

James Vance before the suicide attempt…

 

James Vance after numerous reconstructive surgeries, post suicide attempt.

Mr. Vance died three years later. But in the meantime, the families filed a product liability lawsuit against Judas Priest and CBS Records, accusing them of being responsible for the suicides. The band placed subliminal messages in their music, particularly the 1978 album Stained Class, and specifically the song “Better By You, Better Than Me,” according to the complaint. Dr. Wilson Bryan Key, the star witness for the Plaintiffs, and a “subliminal messaging expert,” said that the foregoing song has subliminal lyrics saying “do it, do it.”

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If you use your imagination and are specifically searching for it, perhaps you can hear the “do it, do it” between the 1:30 and 1:50 marks of the song.

Lyrics are protected by the First Amendment, except for rappers. But Washoe County District Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead ruled that subliminal messages are unwanted and unwitting speech, thus not protected by the First Amendment. The case went to trial as a result.

The Plaintiffs still had to prove the lyrics directly caused the suicides. Even if you accept that “do it” exists in the song, there is no antecedent therein (e.g. “do it suicide”). Further, the defendants’ attorneys drilled home the facts that both boys were already suicidal and miscreants. The defense also called the alleged subliminal messages “phonetic flukes” that are only audible via the power of suggestion by the Plaintiffs’ star witness.

Long story short, Judge Whitehead, in a 93-page decision published on August 24, 1990, cleared Judas Priest and CBS Records of wrongdoing. He acknowledged hearing the subliminal message “do it.” But the Plaintiffs failed to prove that the message was placed there deliberately and that the lyrics were the precipitating factor in the suicides.

MIT cleared in Han Nguyen 2009 suicide

Mr. Han Nguyen (pictured) was a 25-year-old, third-year PhD marketing student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (“MIT”). He jumped to his death from the roof of a campus building on June 2, 2009. His family filed a wrongful death lawsuit on September 6, 2011 in state court. It accused MIT and several of its employees of negligence for failing to prevent the suicide.

Mr. Nguyen had issues throughout his three years at MIT. He complained to his program coordinator that he’s failing tests because “I don’t know how to take exams.” Said coordinator referred him to student disabilities services in May 2007, but Nguyen declined to see them.

He was then referred to MIT Mental Health, but was combative with the personnel, and denied that he had mental health issues. Nguyen did, however, disclosed that he attempted suicide twice prior to enrolling at MIT. He wanted a quick fix for his testing failure. But nothing like that was available.

Mr. Nguyen stopped seeing all MIT health professionals after September 2007, according to court documents. Instead he saw nine private doctors in Rhode Island and Massachusetts for the next two years, totaling 90 in-person visits. His last appointment was on May 28, 2009, five days prior to his suicide. That doctor concluded that Nguyen was not suicidal. MIT professors made several accommodations for Nguyen, including special testing dates and times that other students did not receive.

It took seven years. But the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled on May 7, 2018 that “universities are not responsible for monitoring and controlling all aspects of their students’ lives.” The Court further reasoned:

“University students are young adults, not young children. Indeed, graduate students are adults in all respects under the law. Universities recognize their students’ adult status, their desire for independence, and their need to exercise their own judgment. Consequently the modern university-student relationship is respectful of student autonomy and privacy.”

The only time a special duty of care arises is when a student attempts suicide on campus and survives. Said duty typically only applies to medical personnel, not “non-clinicians,” the Court ruled. Further, the university tried to help Nguyen, but he declined their help.

Alex Kearns vs. Robinhood suicide

Mr. Alex Kearns (pictured) was a University of Nebraska student. He started options trading on the Robinhood app while a senior in high school. Robinhood brands itself as a user-friendly platform with commission-free trading. The company is best known for its data breaches and colluding with Wall Street hedge funds to protect billionaires.

Mr. Kearns was at home in Naperville, Illinois during the summer break from college on June 12, 2020. He logged into his Robinhood account and saw what he believed to be a negative balance of $730,000 balance. Mr. Kearns frantically tried reaching Robinhood customer service to clarify what has happening. But nobody answered, accept for automated replies. Mr. Kearns jumped in front of an oncoming freight train later that day.

He left a suicide note, published in part by his cousin-in-law, Bill Brewster, via Twitter, on June 17, 2020. It said, in part, “How was a 20-year-old with no income able to get assigned almost a million dollars worth of leverage? I have no clue what I was doing now in hindsight.”

Mr. Kearns didn’t really owe $730,000. He was writing put options and trading spreads. It’s all just glorified gambling. But spreads are considered one of the “safest” options strategies. It’s unclear if he was trading credit or debit spreads. But in layman’s terms, the $730,000 was the risk value versus the long legs that hadn’t exercised yet. The latter hedged the $730,000. Mr. Kearns probably only would have lost or gained a few hundred dollars in the end. But all he saw was the following.

Robinhood semi-acknowledged wrongdoing one week after the suicide. The company’s founders released a statement, saying they were “personally devastated” by the news of Mr. Kearns’ suicide. They also acknowledged that their interface was flawed; and that they fell short on customer service.

The Kearns family filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Robinhood in Santa Clara (California) County Superior Court on February 8, 2021. Robinhood settled the case out of court less than four months later.

Why the Katie Meyer lawsuit will fail

Again, this lawsuit was not officially filed on November 23, as mainstream media reported. The complaint declares in the beginning “the actions that led to the death of Katie Meyer began and ended with Stanford University.” It is alleged that Stanford “negligently and recklessly” sent Ms. Meyer an email on February 28, 2022, informing her of disciplinary action and the processes thereof. She committed suicide hours later.

Ms. Meyer “spilled” hot coffee on a football player while riding her bike the previous summer. The complaint implies that Ms. Meyer executed the coffee attack (“spill”) because the football player allegedly sexually assaulted another female soccer player.

The complaint repeats the alleged “sexual assault” by the unnamed football player numerous times, making it a key point of this entire lawsuit. It then appears to imply that Stanford had a duty to provide special treatment and processes for issuing the disciplinary notice to Ms. Meyer.

The lawsuit appears to argue that Ms. Meyer had the right to exercise vigilante justice against the football player since Stanford determined that there was no wrongdoing in the case. Stanford warned Ms. Meyer on September 17, 2021 that they were investigating the coffee assault.

Ms. Meyer responded on November 21, 2021, again insinuating that she had the right to take vigilante justice against an “untouchable male athlete.”

The lawsuit goes on to say that Stanford had insufficient evidence to formally charge Ms. Meyer. In other words, most of this wrongful death lawsuit is Meyer defending herself against the disciplinary action posthumously. All of these arguments should have and could have been litigated during the course of the disciplinary process.

The foregoing three suicide/wrongful death lawsuits were included for a reason. First, the Judas Priest lawsuit. The Meyer Plaintiffs must prove that Stanford maliciously and deliberately caused the suicide; that Stanford knew Meyer would commit suicide almost immediately after the school commenced disciplinary action via the email. The Plaintiffs are either arguing that Stanford should have never commenced disciplinary action, or they did it in too mean of a way, making them responsible for Ms. Meyer’s death.

The Han Nguyen suicide will most definitely be brought up at the Meyer trial, if the case makes it that far. Universities are not responsible for every and all aspects of young adult students’ lives. Further, Ms. Meyer never attempted suicide previously at Stanford. Thus no duty of care was ever created. The Alex Kearns wrongful death case settled for two reasons – Robinhood essentially admitted responsibility, and it did not want to further tarnish its reputation with a long, drawn out trial.

Vaccine mandate wrongful death lawsuit would stand a better chance

The Meyer family is obviously well off. They paid at least a $30,000 retainer fee (probably much more) for the four lawyers handling this case.

These attorneys ought to be ashamed of themselves for taking these people’s money and filing this lawsuit. There’s no pathway to success based on precedent and common sense. These lawyers could have made a true impact, and had a much better chance of winning, by going with the vaccine mandate and post-injection suicide arguments.

We wrote in April that college athlete suicide rates in 2022 had already shattered all previous records in just four months. Mainstream media acknowledged this phenomenon two months later. There’s also plenty of scientific and anecdotal evidence showing that the mRNA injections change people’s personalities.

Most recently, a case study published on November 17, in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology chronicled the case of a 26-year-old woman. She had several severe adverse reactions to her second Pfizer mRNA injection within four hours of the shot, including chest pains, throbbing migraines and fainting. The patient also reported suicidal thoughts and was diagnosed with severe panic disorder.

RELATED: Timike Balogh: 36-year-old Hungarian woman suffers hair loss, digestive failure, myriad other post-Moderna adverse effects for over a year, commits suicide (November 15, 2022)

 

Turkish doctors published a case report in October 2021. One patient developed manic episodes and required hospitalization for 15 days, just 24 hours after his first mRNA injection. When he was released, he had no recollection of anything that happened in those two weeks. A second patient had suicidal thoughts just hours after an mRNA injection. The doctors concluded the following:

“[mRNA injections] damage the central nervous system via autoimmune mechanisms due to excessive production and release of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Vaccination may also lead to neuropsychiatric symptoms by damaging thiamine metabolism.”

We’ve also chronicled numerous cases of seemingly-decent people turning into obnoxious, vile monsters after receiving the injections. There are also cases of almost immediate-onset, post-injection dementia. It would have been a tough, precedent-setting case for the Meyers, since they’d be taking on big pharma and mainstream media. But their current lawsuit, as written, is nothing more than a spectacle that hopes for feminism and notoriety to prevail in a court of law.

There are a couple other interesting suicide cases currently pending. Mr. Luke Tang was the 18-year-old Harvard student who committed suicide on September 12, 2015. His family filed a wrongful death suit three years later. Mr. Tang previously attempted suicide on campus in April 2015. That fact may work against Harvard, since a duty of care was created by the previous suicide attempt. The case is likely to go to trial in 2023.

The Amazon suicide lawsuit is also interesting. Two teenagers ordered a legal substance called sodium nitrite from Amazon. They committed suicide by ingesting it. The parents filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Amazon in September for selling the substance. It appears that the small, penniless online suicide forum where the kids got the information on sodium nitrite would actually be responsible, if anyone at all. But there’s no money in suing a small website.

Katie Meyer will die in vain because of this frivolous lawsuit. She could have been a hero, much like she was on the soccer pitch. What a story that would be if the parents took on big pharma. Even if they lost, it would have been impactful. Instead, four lawyers will cash in to the tune of a quarter-million dollars-plus over the next few years for a lawsuit that was dead from the start.

Stay vigilant and protect your friends an loved ones.

 

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donthatemetoomuch
2 months ago

The parents of that lady are well off and sent their daughter to be properly indoctrinated in one of the so-called “prestigious” schoosl of the system. It means that they are sucking at the tits of the system and devout worshipers of it.

They would never consider rocking the boat. Instead, they would rather just put on a dog-and-poney show.

Just like that woman who offered her young daughter to be experimented on by big-pharma, then when the daughter got damaged, the mother starts screaming for “justice”. She is just putting on a show in the hope that history will forget her culpability

Astana
Astana
2 months ago

WE HAVE A WINNER! Exactly all of this. Her daughter would’ve likely ended up a childless unfulfilled career woman, that takes their anger at their life choices out on others. We’ve already got millions of those types running around, I’m not broken hearted that another society destroyer won’t be around to destroy society further. I mean, I do feel bad but also, I don’t. Probably not like I should. I wonder if this girl wanted to lock up all anti vaxxers and deny us our freedoms? If so, good riddance.

Rita
Rita
2 months ago

Interesting so in one of those court findings it states Students are young adults with a desire for independence and need to exercise their own JUDGMENT and universities RESPECT STUDENT AUTONOMY!!! This should be used to fight against the jab mandates don’t you think??? As far as the suicides I think it has to do with the medications these young people take..maybe Adderol (bad spelling) all those suspicious ADD and ADHD drugs the ignorant parents put them on. (I know 2 of these) And according to the side effects of anti depressants..suicide is a factor (know a few of these also)

SUMC
SUMC
2 months ago

Stanford University is a pressure cooker for everyone that calls ‘The Farm’ their home, including Katie Meyer. The University cares more about their reputation than anything or anyone, including Katie. It doesn’t surprise me that another campus rape was hushed and went unpunished, leading to vigilante justice. Unfortunately, it’s a little late for her family to rage against the machine, for the machine has taken their beautiful and talented daughter. Her death is nothing to Stanford and poorly guided legal efforts will do nothing to change the machine or bring her back. rest in peace Katie

…and don’t get me started on Harvard, home of the Unabomber.

mike
mike
2 months ago
Reply to  SUMC

For how many people does a college/university become an idol?

Ron
Ron
2 months ago

Truth is, most people do not care anything about you, about me, about any of us. Maybe you have some family members or a few friends who haven’t betrayed you. Maybe there are a few in your circle of faith who will always be there for you. Maybe there are some who would miss you if you were gone.

But for the most part, in the end, the only One who really cares about you is the Lord God, and perhaps a few people who have His mind and heart. The medical community, the politicians, the media, academia, famous entertainers, the virtue signalers on social media, and all the rest of them… they use you for what they can squeeze out of you and they would not miss a moment of sleep if you died, suicide or otherwise.

Justice has become inverted and truth is fallen in the streets. I’m not cynical. Just being real.

Nobody is coming to save you. No one is coming to save us. Not anyone in this world, anyway.

Fortunately we have much to live for. We know how the story ends.

mike
mike
2 months ago
Reply to  Ron

AMEN!

Kate
Kate
2 months ago
Reply to  Ron

Well said.

Annie
Annie
2 months ago

Entitled is what I call it. I am not a fan of women’s soccer. Not the sport or women playing it but what it has become. My daughter cheered in high-school and the girls soccer team routinely put them down because it was too traditional, i.e. feminine. Girls soccer had the highest rate of concussions. Many players could only eat via candlelight because light hurt their eyes. The parents routinely pushed them to play even after a concussion. Total sh-t show. Suicides occurred at a higher rate for these girls. Brain injuries etc. Katie Meyer’s felt she could throw hot coffee on a football player because she didn’t agree with the outcome of a case. Now she was under investigation for this assault. Not fair to her because she’s an entitled feminist. I may sound harsh, but the women’s Olympic soccer team is a good representation for this attitude. Not all but a lot of them. When asked to watch a girls soccer game I said why bother as the boys are faster and they or a tranny could out play them. They didn’t like that. Tough. I can’t stand feminist as they have ruined a lot. Like girls sports, especially girls soccer.

#FBA Sasha
#FBA Sasha
2 months ago

I love these in-depth, hard-hitting articles. Although the picture of that kid who shot himself while listening to Judas Priest might give me nightmares. The Meyers family sounds disconnected from reality. Just reading those screenshots from the lawsuit, they really think their daughter deserved royal treatment and no accountability for her actions.

“Stanford failed to respond to Katie’s expression of distress, instead ignored it and scheduled a meeting for 3 days later via email.” What the hell are they supposed to do? Send her the disciplinary notice personally with grief counselors and flowers? Geez, this lawsuits makes them and their daughter unsympathetic in my eyes.

A rope leash
A rope leash
2 months ago

Suicide has always been a conundrum. People in suffering in prison, people starving to death in abstract poverty, people severely disabled, heartbroken people…all seem to be able to summon their will to live for the most part.

The fact that fortunate people commit suicide is indicative of a societal crack, and an epidemic of mental illness. There really was no reason for this person to kill herself, other than misguided thinking and cultural pressures.

I’ve known a couple of suicides in my life. My impression was that they didn’t feel loved, and wanted to punish themselves and others with an outrageous act. The bottom line is there’s not much that can be done if someone wants to take their own life, and no one should feel responsible, because in the final analysis, there’s nothing they can do short of constant surveillance to prevent it.

It’s an odd act…brave and cowardly at the same time. I’ve had my own bouts with depression, but never seriously considered taking myself out. There’s always tomorrow.

I like life. You can’t run from it. It’s there until it isn’t, so I try to make it pleasant.

The future depends on the now. You can’t make it better if you no longer exist. We’re headed for hard times. Dying now won’t change it. Only the living can make it better, and only the living can quell the suffering.

If you’re having bad thoughts, try a magnesium supplement. It works for me.

Thanks for this blog. It’s a bastion of hope.

LoriQ
LoriQ
2 months ago
Reply to  A rope leash

My brother had End Stage Bone Cancer at the age of fifty. When he committed suicide, he wasn’t thinking about punishing someone else. He wanted the excruciating pain he was in to STOP (due to his Obama Care insurance, he didn’t qualify for hospice – long, convoluted story). He wasn’t a coward either. He lived in severe pain for 22 years after he suffered a catastrophic fall off the roof of his building. My brother was an industrious, intelligent young man who was well on his way to becoming a multimillionaire before the age of thirty. He owned his own businesses and was expanding further until that fateful day when he fell (which triggered the bone cancer).

Not all Suicides are the same. It’s offensive and insulting to paint people who choose this act with the same brush. In the end, we don’t know what is really going on with people. The pain isn’t always emotional. And even if it is, you still don’t know what is behind their pain. They could be survivors of extreme abuse, poverty, bullying, rape or something else equally as harrowing. I don’t advocate for suicide, however, I am not going to speak ill of them either.

It’s easy to sit here and judge other people with our own measuring stick from our high horse. This doesn’t make us wise. It’s much harder for many people to put on another person’s shoes and look through their life lenses. Yet, it would make this world a bit more kind and civil if we did.

Danny
Danny
2 months ago
Reply to  A rope leash

It looks like temporary insanity in some cases I’ve studied. Sometimes people jump off bridges and such. Once I reached my 40s.. I decided to stick around to see the end of the movie.

Kiel
Kiel
2 months ago

“Justice and the law are two completely separate, unrelated issues.”

Brian, you have an artistic gift for understatement.

On the other hand, for men, it’s guilty until proven innocent.

Katie was a strong & independent woman until ‘The Patriarchy’ no longer had her back because it no longer needed her vote . . . which means she was neither.

Tricia L.
Tricia L.
2 months ago

Hi Brian. I have subscribed to your blog since March of 2021. This is my first comment. I’ve been practicing product liability law for 22 years. You nailed this one. For someone who is not an actual attorney, you definitely get it. I’m also donating for the first time today.

Please give us lawyers a break. You are very hard on us in your articles. These are unprecedented times. I admire your strength and fearlessness. But many lawyers, including myself, work for large law firms. We are forced into vaccine mandates and defending vaccines. It’s the nature of the business.

I know that God is protecting you. Thank you for this blog and all of your hard work.

Atom man
Atom man
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

Just curious – any chance of informing her legal team of the additional arguments before papers are filed?

Beth
Beth
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

Forced? If your experienced then for heavens sake fight on our side and not for the money. Unreak. Lawyers are a joke and you definitely don’t get it. Sure Brian’s excellent analysis tickles you professionally but you have no sense of the underlying ethics and you don’t care to strategise ethically beccause you’re just forced to work for these large lawfirms and forced to accept your big fat salary, and vaccines are just the tip of the iceberg regarding what youre forced to do, much of which would no doubt cause reasonable people vomit if they knew. Hope its time for your next boost soon, not to be nasty but in the fight for human life one less lawyer fighting on the wrong side is helpful, and thanks for letting us know publicly that you donated… always a great sign huh

donthatemetoomuch
2 months ago
Reply to  Beth

I was going to reply to her exactly as you did, by mentioning “forced into vaccine mandates”.

Thank you for not sugar-coating your reply and telling it eloquently as it is.

Truth is brutal, it takes no hostages. That’s its beauty. When the fragrance of Truth starts to fill the air, falsehood vanishes and the stage is set for peace, harmony and balance at last. Yes, the hypocrites will be squashed in the process.

Con-vid 1987
Con-vid 1987
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

How exactly a very unconstitutional piss poor narrative driven vaccine that being thrust upon everyone can possibly be defended?

I know next to nothing about lawsuits but whatever reasoning in favor of the mandates and not having these injections pull from the market by now couldn’t hold up to any scrutiny.

Especially now when this house of cards is about to come crashing down.

I need some insight on your side of this mass depopulation agenda.

Rebekah_
Rebekah_
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

“Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin.” James 4:17KJV

What a shame you can’t see that you are part of the problem. Those who go along to get along, despite knowing what they do is wrong, prop up evil with their actions. I pity you. I will pray for you.

Indomitable
Indomitable
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

We are forced into vaccine mandates and defending vaccines. It’s the nature of the business.

It seems to be the nature of YOU too, for going along with it. You remind me very much of Cody Robinson, but your last name may as well be Fauci. Apparently you are doing your part in advancing this agenda.

Please give us lawyers a break. You are very hard on us in your articles.

Hilarious. Brian is rather understated in his comments, doing an excellent job of sticking to simple facts. I would LOVE to see an example from you of how he was “hard” on your profession. I personally interpret your comment as “Please don’t expose us with the truth of the illogical, lying, sell-my-soul-to-the-highest-bidder vermin that we are.” Maybe with a specific example it could change my viewpoint?

Astana
Astana
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

Idk man, I hear ya but there’s not a damn thing in this world that could get me to take any vaccine. Literally nothing. I would rather die first, at least if I died it would be on my own terms, not waiting around for the clot shot to kill me. Probably have this attitude because when I was raped I refused to be a victim of ANYONE, ever again. I will die on my feet fighting because once you feel powerless, you refuse to ever be that way again (at least I did, I loathe victimhood culture).

Kiel
Kiel
2 months ago
Reply to  Tricia L.

 But many lawyers, including myself, work for large law firms. We are forced into vaccine mandates and defending vaccines. It’s the nature of the business.
_____________________

‘Just Following Orders’, that’s the argument you’re going with, eh?

You may want to check the mirror, you’re in a better position than most to protect yourself and effect change – protecting your paycheck on this one doesn’t cut it.

youcancallmethekenneth
youcancallmethekenneth
2 months ago

“I suffer from anxiety and perfectionism, as so many female athletes do. We all know too well that in professional settings women have everything to lose and have to work twice as hard…”
~”Katie’s Distress” item #153 above
Yes, as the author quite rightly pointed out, not hard to see in which direction this show trial is headed. If the parents paid tens of thousands to attorneys to file a suit based on such bilious nonsense, they fully deserve to be parted from their money.

Sean O'Connor
Sean O'Connor
2 months ago

Since she has been making money as $tudent Athlete at Stanford her family easily could use $6310 of the CA Labor Code to argue to the forced inoculations constituted an imminent hazard under CAL OSHA law. I’m also surprised they didn’t use DFEH discrimination causes of action under education and employment.

Then again while litigating my own cases over the vax I find many plaintiffs lawyers are provax…so go figure… suicide is a leading event in VAERS for c-19 💉🧬

Sanjoy Mahajan
Sanjoy Mahajan
1 month ago

It may all be theater. Most likely, there was no suicide. Rather, Katie Meyer died from the injectible holy water that Stanford mandated. But Stanford will never admit it publicly and will fight a lawsuit on that issue till the end of time. But with this lawsuit, the parents and Stanford can settle for an “undisclosed amount,” seal the settlement, and all sides can pretend that it was a suicide.

M L
M L
1 month ago
Reply to  Sanjoy Mahajan

I’m suprised I had to scroll down this far to see this comment.

On the day her death was announced, my first thought was she died of the jab, and the University & the victim’s parents are colluding with Pharma to cover it up.

I was unaware of a potential lawsuit. But point well taken that this could be the opportunity they need to secure a confidential settlement, over a seemingly unrelated issue.

Bonus points: the parents get to virtue signal over #metoo, while their daughters last words are bitching about the patriarchy,

But sincerely, I am sorry for their loss. But no amount of Pharma blood money will bring their daughter back.

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